Sugar found in sea beds equivalent to “32 billion cans of coke”: research

Sugar found in sea beds equivalent to '32 billion cans of coke ': research

When seabed is inspected, large amounts of sugar are found in their soil systems.

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology have found mountains of sugar beneath ocean grass across the world’s oceans. Seagrass grasslands are highly efficient in carbon capture and one of the top carbon capturing ecosystems in the world.

According to the institute, one square kilometer of seaweed saves about twice as much carbon and 35 times faster than forest land. When the seabed around these grasslands was inspected, large amounts of sugar were found in their soil systems.

Manuel Leibek, head of the research team conducting research at the institute, explained that the amount of sugar in the mass was about 80 times higher than previously measured in the marine environment.

“To put it this way: we estimate that there are 0.6 to 1.3 million tons of sugar worldwide, mainly in the form of sucrose, in the rhizosphere of seaweed … that’s comparable to the amount of sugar in about 32 billion cans of coke!”

Although this is a very new discovery, seagrass is one of the most endangered habitats in the world. According to the institute, they are rapidly declining in all oceans, and one-third of the world’s oceans could already be lost.

Some insights have been given to Mr. Lib by saying, “Our research clearly shows how much blue carbon is lost to the world’s oceans and coastal ecosystems when seagrass communities are destroyed. Contains a large amount of sucrose, which results in the loss of stored carbon. Our calculations show that if sucrose in the rhizosphere of the seaweed is consumed by germs, at least 1.54 million tons of carbon dioxide will be released into the atmosphere worldwide … which is equal to the amount of carbon dioxide emitted by 330,000 vehicles annually. “

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